New internationals bring interesting mix of cultures

International students from Europe have winter fun in Kahurangi National Park

 

The 25th of July 2016 was the start of the third term. For existing Nayland College students, this wasn’t an exciting day. However, for the big group of international students, it was the first school day in a new country.

The group consists of 58 students with 17 different cultures and 15 languages and so is a mix of very contrasting people. Now it is possible to meet teenagers from Brazil and Chile here at Nayland or to have contact with a European student. They come from Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Russia and Britain. There are also a lot of students from Asian countries such as Korea, Russia, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan. Two thirds of the group are girls.

Every student’s background is different but they are now all in the same situation. Everything is new. “I think, still after the half year, I will get lost on this school campus,” German student Marlene Holtkotte said.

Most international students are open-minded and try to speak only English, even with pupils from their own country. Some students are disappointed about the big chance to speak their first language, because of the large amount of students from particular countries. “I would like to live really here. I would like to be a real Kiwi!” Ashley Yang from Korea said.

The students from the group have come to New Zealand with different motivations and aims. “I want to learn to know a new culture… to meet new people and make experience,” Leticia Lange Ramirez from Brazil said. “I would like to improve my English skills, make experience […] also learn to know new people from different countries, so we can share our cultures,” Ashley explained.

Even if most things are going well, everything isn’t perfect. “Sometimes it’s boring, then I wish to be at home” explained Nanae Kosaka from Japan. She will stay at Nayland till 2017.

Leticia and Ashley have stayed here for two months and are not home sick. Both laughed when asked if their families would miss them. “Oh yes, we have every day contact, we skype and text.” This is what most internationals are doing. However, the acclimatization is nearly over and New Zealand is starting to become their real home. “I think everywhere, where I go is my home,” Leticia said.

 

Mr Wilson has time for a photo opportunity with a visiting Korean group

Mr Wilson has time for a photo opportunity with a visiting Korean group

 

The internationals receive a rose each on Rose Day

The internationals receive a rose each on Rose Day